evden eve nakliyatsehirlerarasi evden eve nakliyat

Study with totally blind people shows how light helps activate the brain

Imprimer

Light enhances brain activity during a cognitive task even in some people who are totally blind, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Montreal and Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital. The findings contribute to scientists' understanding of everyone's brains, as they also revealed how quickly light impacts on cognition. “We were stunned to discover  that the brain still respond significantly to light in these rare three completely blind patients  despite having absolutely no conscious vision at all,” said senior co-author Steven Lockley. “Light doesn't just allow us to see, it tells the brain whether it's night or day which in –turn ensures that our physiology, metabolism and behavior are synchronized with environmental time”. “For diurnal species like ours, light stimulates day-like brain activity, improving alertness and mood, and enhancing performance on many cognitive tasks,” explained senior co-author Julie Carrier. The results indicate that their brains can still “see”, or detect, light via a novel photoreceptor in the ganglion cell layer of the retina, different from the rods and cones we use to see.

Scientists believe, however, that these specialized photoreceptors in the retina also contribute to visual function in the brain even when cells in the retina responsible for normal image formation have lost their ability to receive or process light. A previous study in a single blind patient suggested that this was possible but the research team wanted to confirm this result in different patients. To test this hypothesis, the three participants were asked to say whether a blue light was on or off, even though they could not see the light. “We found that the participants did indeed have a non-conscious awareness of the light – they were able to determine correctly when the light was on greater than chance without being able to see it,” explained first author Gilles Vandewalle.

The next steps involved looking closely at what happened to brain activation when light was flashed at their eyes at the same time as their attentiveness to a sound was monitored. “The objective of this second test was to determine whether the light affected the brain patterns associated with attentiveness – and it did,” said first author Olivier Collignon.

Finally, the participants underwent a functional MRI brain scan as they performed a simple sound matching task while lights were flashed in their eyes. “The fMRI further showed that during an auditory working memory task, less than a minute of blue light activated brain regions important to perform the task. These regions are involved in alertness and cognition regulation as well being as key areas of the default mode network,” Vandewalle explained. Researchers believe that the default network is linked to keeping a minimal amount of resources available for monitoring the environment when we are not actively doing something. “If our understanding of the default network is correct, our results raise the intriguing possibility that light is key to maintaining sustained attention” agreed Lockley and Carrier. “This theory may explain why the brain's performance is improved when light is present during tasks.”

About the study:

Joint senior authors Associate Professor Steven W. Lockley and Professor Julie Carrier will publish “Blue Light Stimulates Cognitive Brain Activity in Visually Blind Individuals” in an upcoming edition of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. Dr Lockley is associate neuroscientist at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and is also affiliated with and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Professor Carrier is affiliated with the University of Montreal's Department of Psychology and the university's affiliated Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine of the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal . First authors Gilles Vanderwalle and Olivier Collignon contributed equally to this work. At the time of publication, Vanderwalle was affiliated with the IUGM and Sacré Coeur Hospital, while Collignon was affiliated with the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Centre. They are now affiliated with the University of Liege and the University of Trento, respectively. This study was supported by the Réseau Vision du Québec and Réseau de Bioimagerie du Québec (RBiQ) and the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé (FRQ-S).  The University of Montreal is officially known as Université de Montréal.

Media contact: William Raillant-Clark International Press Attaché University of Montreal (officially Université de Montréal) Tel: 514-343-7593 | w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca | @uMontreal_News

Jessica Maki

Media Relations and Social Media Specialist

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Tel: 617-534-1603 | jmaki3@partners.org

 

Dossiers

 

Le campus de l'UdeM en Mauricie célèbre ses 10 ans

Le pari était téméraire. Pour attirer des médecins en Mauricie, l'Université de Montr...

 

Le Brésil dans la mire de l'UdeM

Entre le Brésil et l'Université de Montréal, il y a des atomes crochus. Des affinités...